Monday, 9 January 2012

Humid Weather

Update: First week of January 2012

The humid, warm days has set
the Sweet Potato off and growing.
The Yacon Smallanthus sonchifolius is thriving too.

Weather Highs and Lows:
Lowest Min 11.8C
Highest Max 39.5C
Rain 14mm

Propagation:
Seeds:
Beans Bush Phaseolus vulgaris Roc D'Or - Green Harvest into Bed 13
Beans Climbing Phaseolus vulgaris - Purple King DT Brown into Bed 1
Zucchini Cucurbita pepo var, melopepo Costata Romanesco - Phoenix Seeds into small pots for transplanting

Harvesting this week:
Salad greens from Goldrush Lettuce, Mushroom Plant, Gotu Kola, Parsley, Shallot Greens, Silverbeet and Leaf Amaranth.
Beans Gourmet Delight 50g
Beans Tongues of Fire 387g
Cucumber Bushy 116g
Squash Scalloped Yellow Button 257g
Tomato Big Rainbow 124g
Tomato Ida Gold 49g
Tomato Money Maker 81g
Tomato Pineapple 47g
Tomato Stor Gul 197g
Cossack Pineapple 111g

Chooks: 31 eggs:-
3 from the lone Barnevelder
13 from the 5 Farmyard Ferals
15 from the 4 Faverolles

The Black Sultana Grapes are staring to colour up!

In Bed 12 in the Kitchen Garden the Capsicums are setting fruit and the Cossack Pineapples are ripening and providing a tasty treat and maybe enough to try some jam soon!

Down in the Pumpkin Jungle several pumpkins have set and are growing fast, the vines seem to be coping with a slight attack of powdery mildew brought on by the unusually humid weather this year.

12 comments:

  1. When I was in Madeira recently, I noticed that the trombocino - trombone squash were sold and eaten as small courgettes. I had some with a meal, they were delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Matron
    I tried the Trobocino a couple of years ago but didn't find them all that productive so I'm trying this trombone gramma (this is more like a pumpkin). I grew up on trombone so it's a trip back to my childhood in a way!!

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  3. My mouth waters seeing your ripening grapes...I have like just ONE grape ripening one a few bunches...I wish more even ripening is happening.

    Nice sweet potato vines! I just got some stems and leaves for cooking from the market and trying to root some to grow. Hope it is not too late.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi SavvyMummy
    Your grapes will get ripe soon enough! :)

    I was concerned that the sweet potato was very slow at taking off but they seem to survive in the ground over winter (not the leaves on top though) so I am not so worried at their late growth. When they shoot pop them in the ground and watch them grow. I still have some more to put in yet!

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  5. I think if I dont remember wrongly, you get lower winter temperatures than here in Victoria? If your sweet potatoes surived in the ground and reshoot, I can probably try doing the same this year. Just have to look for a good spot somewhere in my crowded garden. The stem cuttings have just rooted, waiting for more roots to appear. :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. Yes I reckon we do get colder here especially with our frosts!!!

    They do re-sprout in late spring and you can take pieces of stem off the plants in the ground and if they have roots already formed you can plant them straight into the ground.

    I only know this when I had a few regrow because I did not know that they were there!!!

    I have also seen sweet potatoes grown in a bin like on this link or this link or in containers like on this link or just train the vines up over a trellis. These are northern hemisphere sites so adjust the planting and harvesting dates.

    This may be use in your crowded garden as the vines will stretch a long way over the ground if you let them!!

    I like the idea of containing them somehow...at least you would be able to find the potatoes later for harvesting.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Wow the link for Eaden's garden is wonderful. Thanks!!! I am actually thinking of growing the plants in deep pots this time but just wondering if they will be able to overwinter fine compared to in the ground. Maybe wrapping the pot with some insulating material will help and heavy mulching which you had suggested before. But wonder how I can prevent any rotting.

    My edible ginger in the ground actualy survived the last winter and reshooted! And i reckon the sweet potato will.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can give it a go, it might work. If you don't try it won't work for sure at least you will get some leaves for greens!

      Delete
  8. Oh ya I think you should be able to find the tubers where the roots are cos the sweet potatoes are swollen roots unlike potatoes which are underground stems. The creepers dont send out new roots into the ground and justt crawl all over. Only those parts which are in the ground should contain sweet potatoes. Hope that makes sense.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great
      I do find they are quite deep in the ground though so I think containers or wicking beds will make harvesting easier.

      Delete
  9. Yes Esp if the ground is hard, it makes digging back breaking compared to harvesting them from loose pliable potting compost, the most just tip the whole pot over. :)

    ReplyDelete

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